Biopharmaceutical CEOs Roundtable (BCR)

 

The Biopharmaceutical CEOs Roundtable (BCR) is a global policy forum where the CEOs of the companies that are members of IFPMA discuss global health challenges and public health policies impacting biomedical innovation. The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers & Associations (IFPMA) is a global association of the world’s leading biopharmaceutical companies and national associations.

BCR Highlights

June 4, 2019 in Tokyo (Japan)

The Biopharmaceutical CEOs Roundtable (BCR) was held in Tokyo on 3-4 June. At the meeting, leaders from four pharma associations (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufactures & Associations (IFPMA), the Pharmaceutical Researchers and Manufactures of America (PhRMA), the Japan Pharmaceutical Association (JPMA) and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA)) handed a joint statement to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe that calls for Japan to 1) accelerate efforts around UHC especially in developing countries, 2) support development in areas with no effective treatments, such as AMR, through partnerships, regulatory harmonization, and predictable and reasonable IP protection rules, and 3) craft legal frameworks that facilitate the use of AI and big data. PM Abe, who briefly attended the CEOs roundtable, expressed the Japanese government’s resolve to push innovation.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and David A. Ricks, President, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Eli Lilly and Company, and President, IFPMA


Group Photo with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe , Tokyo, Japan

BCR Supported Initiatives

AMR Action Fund

The AMR Action Fund

The world is losing its most powerful tool in healthcare: antibiotics. The reason is rapidly rising antibiotic-resistant infections – also called antimicrobial resistance, or AMR. Superbugs resistant to antibiotics not only threaten lives, they undermine every aspect of modern medicine.

We urgently need new antibiotics, but there are few in the pipeline because of a paradox: despite the huge societal costs of AMR, there is no viable market for new antibiotics. New antibiotics are used sparingly to preserve effectiveness, so developers do not recoup their investment. The result is a huge public health need for new antibiotics, but a lack of funding for antibiotic R&D, particularly the later stages of clinical research, creating a “valley of death” between discovery and patients.

To bridge this gap, more than 20 leading pharmaceutical companies are launching a ground-breaking collective venture to invest nearly $1 billion through a new AMR Action Fund that aims to bring 2 to 4 new antibiotics to patients by the end of the decade. The AMR Action Fund will forge partnerships with institutions and philanthropic organizations to strengthen and accelerate antibiotic development. It will also work with governments to ensure there is a sustainable pipeline of new antibiotics to fight superbugs. Together, we must act now to safeguard our future from this global threat.

 

Find out more: AMR Action Fund : www.amractionfund.com